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LEGO Announces GNU/LInux-Powered Mindstorms EV3 Platform

Unknown Lamer posted about a year and a half ago | from the robotic-overlords dept.

Hardware Hacking 164

First time accepted submitter Barryke writes "Today LEGO announces the new mohawk (NASA's turf) sporting MINDSTORMS EV3 platform (press release). And with details on its features and innards (in Dutch) which in short comes down to: 'Its intelligent brick sports an ARM9-soc running Linux on 64MB RAM and 16MB storage memory, and supports SD cards. There are also four ports, which allow four other 'Bricks' can be connected. The intelligent brick can be reached by WiFi, USB and Bluetooth, and supports control via Android and iOS devices. It comes with 3 servo's, two touch sensors and an IR sensor to track other robots at upto six meters. It also includes 17 build plans, shown in 3D using Adobe Inventor Publisher.'"

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164 comments

awesome (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514211)

mindstorms are too good for kids

Re:awesome (2)

ikaruga (2725453) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516567)

Lego are the best adult toys.

Re:awesome (3, Informative)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516661)

Lego are the best adult toys.

Just wait until you discover marital aids.

Re:awesome (2)

RaceProUK (1137575) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516731)

Lego are the best adult toys.

Just wait until you discover marital aids.

Just don't combine the two :S

Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (5, Interesting)

tepples (727027) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514221)

From the two English articles, I see a Linux kernel. I don't see any evidence that the user space on top of it is GNU. More likely is BusyBox/Linux.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (5, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514271)

But... but they told me that I can't call Linux Linux but I must call it GNU/Linux instead. Are you saying this is wrong now!?

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (4, Informative)

WarJolt (990309) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514357)

GNU and Linux can be separated.

GNU is all the core utilities and libraries typically associated with a Linux system.
Linux is the kernel.
Put them together you get GNU/Linux.
BusyBox is not GNU although can be built using GNU libc, so has some GNU.

Android is not dependent on GNU at all although uses the C library.

Many non-GNU projects use the GPL.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (2)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515473)

Whoosh!

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516157)

If you didn't understand that, then maybe slashdot isn't the site for you. ;)

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515673)

BusyBox is not GNU although can be built using GNU libc, so has some GNU.

Why would you want to do that?
uClibc is hosted on the same page as BusyBox. It's smaller and has less bloat.

If you opt to go the GNU libc, why wouldn't you go all the way and use the entire GNU toolkit?

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516457)

You're free to call Linux Linux (in fact, you should do so), but what most people refer to as Linux is a whole lot more than just Linux.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514273)

From the two English articles, I see a Linux kernel. I don't see any evidence that the user space on top of it is GNU. More likely is BusyBox/Linux.

If so, that is bad news.
Not only is busybox just incompatible enough to be dangerous, but like RIAA, the busybox copyright holders think it's a great idea to sue its users when they infringe.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514373)

...If so, that is bad news.
Not only is busybox just incompatible enough to be dangerous, but like RIAA, the busybox copyright holders think it's a great idea to sue its users when they infringe.

I think they just sue cheap-ass companies that ripoff their code with no attribution and use it in commercial products without complying with the license. You know the parasite companies - they use and abuse but never give back to the community.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (5, Interesting)

IVI4573R (614125) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514733)

What he said. They sue people distributing their code without source. For instance, Linksys routers. If it wasn't for them standing up for their copyright and the GPL we wouldn't have all the nice alternate firmwares like DD-WRT, Tomato, etc. I've never hear of Busybox ever suing an end user.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515181)

I've never hear of Busybox ever suing an end user.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/BusyBox#GPL_lawsuits [wikipedia.org]

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (4, Insightful)

cancerouspete (2746963) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515241)

was that link to reinforce the comment, or counter it? looks like it was an attempt at countering....if so re-read the wiki article

SPOILER: link gives no mention of end-users being sued, only companies that failed to adhere to the terms. clarification that companies are not end-users.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514743)

Um, you realize that the Linux copyright owners also sue people for infringing? If they didn't, they wouldn't bother with copyrights and licensing agreements--they would just make it public domain.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (-1)

AK Marc (707885) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514865)

You can sue for copyright for something other than infringing. I've seen them sue for failing to distribute source in violation of the license, but that's not infringing.

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (3, Informative)

petman (619526) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515333)

You can sue for copyright for something other than infringing. I've seen them sue for failing to distribute source in violation of the license, but that's not infringing.

Infringing: 1. Actively break the terms of (a law, agreement, etc.): "infringe a copyright". [lmgtfy.com]

Re:Linux, not necessarily GNU/Linux (3, Insightful)

tibit (1762298) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514719)

Not that there's much need for generic userspace. It'd probably be something custom anyway, on such a small system. It's not a general purpose setup.

Autodesk, not Adobe (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514303)

Man, I bet Autodesk will be pissed to learn that Adobe released a product with the same name as their Inventor Publisher.

Re:Autodesk, not Adobe (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516643)

How did this get +5 informative??? It's Microsoft Publisher, it's not even an Adobe program!

Would have loved this... (3, Insightful)

docmordin (2654319) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514399)

I would have loved this when I was growing up, considering that programmable robots at that time were limited to industry and research labs at universities.

In any event, the asking price seems a bit too high for what LEGO are offering and with what's now available today; touching on just one facet, after a cursory glance on Mouser/DigiKey, PCB manufacturing companies, and 3D printing shops, the so-called intelligent brick, along with its circuitry innards, could easily be fabricated on a one-off basis for under $75-100 USD. For $350 USD, they should have at least thrown in a decent CMOS camera and more servos.

Re:Would have loved this... (2)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514455)

That $350 also includes a bunch of LEGO technic, which isn't exactly cheap.

Re:Would have loved this... (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514627)

yes plastic is so expensive

Re:Would have loved this... (4, Informative)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514659)

Plastic may be inexpensive. LEGO isn't... for the amount of plastic that you actually get anyways, It's actually pretty pricey.

Of course, some would argue that it's worth it, because LEGO has considerably higher quality building bricks than any of its competitors.

Re:Would have loved this... (3, Interesting)

tibit (1762298) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514731)

Try molding those bricks like they do and see how inexpensive that is :)

Re:Would have loved this... (5, Informative)

dbc (135354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515005)

You've got that right. Lego molds are extremely precise -- the jewelry of the machinists' art, and hand cleaned and polished periodically. And they use only top quality resins -- there is ABS, and then there is ABS -- better resins cost more. That is why Lego is expensive.

Re:Would have loved this... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515143)

Economics 101 - it's expensive because consumers are willing to pay the expensive price. LEGO's prices are not based on costs

Re:Would have loved this... (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515635)

Economics 102 - Consumers are willing to pay the expensive price because of high perceived quality, which tends to be due to high quality, which tends to cost more to produce.

Re:Would have loved this... (4, Insightful)

Mister Liberty (769145) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516817)

Economics 103 - From 101 and 102 some would conclude that apparently the entire manufacture / market / consumer cycle is a rational process

Re:Would have loved this... (2, Insightful)

countach (534280) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515161)

It's a top quality product, sure. But it is still just moulded plastic. They could sell it a LOT cheaper if they wanted.

Could they? Lego is not Apple (5, Interesting)

SmallFurryCreature (593017) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515471)

We know Apple could sell the iPhone cheaper because Apple makes massive profits. Does Lego make massive profits? No, in fact before it re-invented itself, it was like Apple in serious trouble of going the way of Meccano. Which still exists but only as a perversion of its former self.

People often seem to think all there is to a product is its physical production. THAT is easy, although Lego is a bit more accurate in its production then most plastic factories, it can be easily replicated to produce a machine to produce simple bricks. BUT that is NOT Lego. Lego is ALL the models, which in box form have often to be in stores for a year or more before hopefully being sold, constantly having to keep up with trends like hot movies because the OLD business model of outdated non-current models wasn't working. And developing Mindstorms wouldn't have been cheap either.

Lego suffers from the high cost of mass production of an INSANE number of parts that all have to be combined, they can't just let one machine run indefinite pushing out one type of brick, it is lots of different pieces in lots of colors that all have to come together in production runs from which only tiny amounts are sent out and the rest has to be stored.

It is a logistacal nightmare and quite different from how other plastic producers like say plastic bottles work, most plastic bottles arrive at the bottling plant in granular form, one machine makes a test tube and another blows it up JUST before it is filled in an constant single item production run. THAT is cheap. Lego's method is not. In fact, lego's method of selling LOTS and LOTS of different models is EXACTLY what Apple is NOT doing. Even Samsung isn't. If Lego was a phone maker, there would be 2000 current models, ALL of them with instructions how alter them completely, combine them and turn them into complex robots.

That is why Lego is expensive. Look at their profits, there is no excessive fat there. You can make cheap clones of a few boxes of lego easily but the entire product range? No. Proof? NOBODY ELSE IS DOING IT! Oh you can buy 1 or 2 lego like models from China but NOT the constantly updated catalog lego catalog. You PAY for that.

Re:Would have loved this... (4, Interesting)

dbc (135354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515765)

Three words for you: Do The Math.

I'm pretty sure you have no idea what it takes to create a mold for injection molding. I have made molds and shot plastic. Crappy molds, because I'm an amateur machinist, but I have shot ABS in molds I made myself using a 20 ton Morgan Press manual injection molding machine, and taught others how to do it. Come back and tell me "it's just plastic" after you have made a mold in hardened tool steel, with tolerances spec'ed in hundreths of millimeters, and a high-polish surface specification, and shot millions of parts while keeping the dimensions and surface finish within spec. You can show me your math then. Until then, stop talking out of your ass.

Re:Would have loved this... (4, Informative)

PiMuNu (865592) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516117)

Agreed. There is a lego clone called megabloks - that uses the same interface as lego but much cheaper. If you mix lego with megabloks, it is clear that the megabloks build quality is far inferior, leading to crap buildings that fall over. lego is actually decent stuff.

Re:Would have loved this... (2)

gsslay (807818) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516309)

You are making a common error in consumer understanding of retail economics. Cost of production is only the start in determining price.

Lego is expensive because that's the optimal price for the company to maximize its profits. It's expensive because enough people are prepared to buy it at that price. It wouldn't matter if a lego brick cost 0.01 to produce, if they can get enough people to buy it for 10 then that's the price they'll sell it at.

Re:Would have loved this... (5, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514671)

Plastic generally isn't, no. Plastic made to LEGO's tolerances? Yes. Their tolerance is as little as 0.002 millimeters!

Re:Would have loved this... (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515477)

Plastic generally isn't, no. Plastic made to LEGO's tolerances? Yes. Their tolerance is as little as 0.002 millimeters!

Sure you're not off by one or two orders of magnitude there? 0.002" I can believe, 2um not,

And - Lego is for kids. The real jewels were fischertechnik : http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fischertechnik .

Re:Would have loved this... (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515543)

No, he is almost right : "The machines that make Lego bricks have tolerances as small as 10 micrometres." (source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lego#Design)

Re:Would have loved this... (1)

Atzanteol (99067) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516637)

10 micrometers = 0.01 millimeters

Re:Would have loved this... (2)

FlyveHest (105693) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516605)

0.002 millimeters is what they told us when I visited the LEGO factory last year, of course, its impossible to verify for a layman like me, but the machinist was very adamant about the microscopic precision they use in the production process

Re:Would have loved this... (2)

Dahamma (304068) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515573)

Silicon is cheap, too, but people seem to pay hundreds of dollars for it after someone puts a little metal and dopant on it...

Re:Would have loved this... (5, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514683)

And all of the software that comes with it would take you a significant amount of money on a "one-off basis." Also, you're getting servos, sensors, instructions, and other parts. For $350, that's pretty fucking good.

Why do people always say, "I could build it myself far cheaper?" This is fucking obvious - you can build it with cheaper parts all on your own, assuming the value of your time is (or approaches) zero for the effort of building and coding everything to work properly. together. It's PHB syndrome - I haven't really considered what I'm getting in the box, I'm just shouting about how expensive it is, because it's not as cheap as the 100-brick lego sets I used to have as a kid.

If you can do it cheaper, then you should open a business and compete with Lego - these are popular kits, and they make good money off them. If, however, you can't... then maybe you should stop crying about the price.

Re:Would have loved this... (1)

tibit (1762298) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514737)

$350 is actually a pretty good price, IMHO.

Re:Would have loved this... (2)

TechyImmigrant (175943) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515321)

Agreed. It's less that the video card I'm about to buy and I can pretend that the lego is 'educational' if my wife inquires.

Two questions (2)

Impy the Impiuos Imp (442658) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514423)

1. Do current Mindstorm devices (servos, sensors) work with it? Or am I going to have to buy all new ones?

2. On-brick programming is cute for toys and whatnot, but I had to build an entire communicative framework to do live remote programming control with my PC being the brains, sending and receiving signals over Bluetooth, basically running a processing stub on the brick, but the AI was live running on the PC.

I need to do that for real AI work, kthxbie.

Re:Two questions (1)

Belial6 (794905) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514685)

1. Do current Mindstorm devices (servos, sensors) work with it? Or am I going to have to buy all new ones?

That's what I want to know. I had the original Mindstorm, and when the v2 came out, it was incompatible to the first one. The other issue is will they start keeping their software up to date? The software for even v2 only runs on XP. This is way to expensive of a toy to have it go obsolete because of an OS upgrade.

Re:Two questions (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514713)

It looks like it's still a NXT brick, so the same electronics can connect to it.

Re:Two questions (3, Insightful)

clonmult (586283) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515855)

Not true; bought my son the NXT2.0 kit for christmas - the software works fine on Windows 7 (but not Win7 SE). As far as I understood it, the sensors are completely compatible between versions.

Re:Two questions (2)

stoolpigeon (454276) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516719)

There may be some confusion here - version 2 of RCX is XP only. NXT and NXT 2.0 came out later. I think (could be wrong of course) that op is talking about v1 and v2 of RCX - which are xp only and it took some hacks to get the usb ir tower to work on xp. If you have a 64 bit machine with 7 it's a no go. Found that out last year when I dug up my v2 RCX kit to mess around. I didn't have time to dig further - I'm guessing to get it to work I'd need to build out a VM maybe that would let me run the old software.

The $350 price is not bad. I bought my RCX kit in the late 90s for $250 I think - or something close to it. The price only going up $100 in that time is impressive I think.

Re:Two questions (5, Informative)

azipsun (180681) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514703)

There's a longer article on CNET [cnet.com] about this that says that the new system will be backwards compatible with existing NXT robots.

Re:Two questions (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514873)

If it's Linux, you can probably make them work with it, even if they're not designed to.

Re:Two questions (1)

similar_name (1164087) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514931)

What was your second question?

Re:Two questions (2)

afidel (530433) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514965)

LOL, back not too many years ago when I was in college those were workstation class specs. In fact I knew a group that did realtime American Sign Language interpretation in only twice as much ram and about 50% more storage on an Indigo2 workstation. If you can't make a robot without realtime video processing work in those specs you're doing something wrong.

Re:Two questions (1)

samkass (174571) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515125)

Since most of the NXT sensors are just packaged up I2C sensors they should be electrically compatible even if they change the wires. For that matter, they'd be electrically compatible with a $35 Raspberry Pi's I2C bus if they could handle 3.3V or had a 3V3-5V circuit between them.

Brick your Brick? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514497)

I wonder whether they can brick their brick? Turn a lego into a brick? Get it? Ah forget it.

Re:Brick your Brick? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514527)

Brick by brick, tock by tick, no matter how thin, no matter how thick....

Re:Brick your Brick? (5, Funny)

PPH (736903) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514569)

Now, not only can you brick your phone, but you can phone your brick.

Re:Brick your Brick? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514609)

Damn facebook... I actually looked for the "like" button on your comment.

Re:Brick your Brick? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515483)

It's only available for those with an account and mod points.

Re:Brick your Brick? (2)

godrik (1287354) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514845)

in soviet russia, brick phone YOU!

Re:Brick your Brick? (1)

cultiv8 (1660093) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514973)

and your car, house, space ship, and tower. Or so says my 3 year old.

But can it run NetBSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514533)

Porting to a new ARM SoC [netbsd.org]

--libman

Re:But can it run NetBSD? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516557)

We don't know.

Ubuntu was made to talk to NXT (2)

eksith (2776419) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514567)

Demonstrated last year [blogspot.com] as a matter of fact, so I guess this wasn't too far off.

Re:Ubuntu was made to talk to NXT (1)

eksith (2776419) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514577)

Oops, I meant year before. My brain is still stuck in 2012.

Geek-gasm (2)

inode_buddha (576844) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514617)

...coming in 3...2...1...

Still a NXT brick at its core, it seems. (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514635)

Although that's a good thing for people who already have stuff, because it means its compatible with NXT sensors and motors, at the same time I'm a bit disappointed because the NXT only has 7 I/O ports, and to control more devices you need another NXT brick.

What would be nice is if you control more than just the 7 devices that you can plug into the brick without having to add another programmable brick to the system... say, by separating things like device power supply from device control, and using a separate battery box (or boxes) to supply power to as many devices as you want, and the cpu simply addresses them in a not entirely dissimilar way to how many USB devices are addressed on a single bus.

Of course, this brick has USB connectivity, so it may at least possible to add this sort of functionality to this device.

Re:Still a NXT brick at its core, it seems. (5, Informative)

sdsucks (1161899) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515219)

What would be nice is if you control more than just the 7 devices that you can plug into the brick without having to add another programmable brick to the system... say, by separating things like device power supply from device control, and using a separate battery box (or boxes) to supply power to as many devices as you want, and the cpu simply addresses them in a not entirely dissimilar way to how many USB devices are addressed on a single bus.

The functionality you want is already available on existing NXT bricks.

The sensor ports on NXT bricks use I2C for communication, allowing "sensors" to be daisy chained and referred to by address. Since the communication across the bus can be bi-directional (though half duplex), you can easily add I2C controlled motor controllers with external power supplies. There is also the RS485 port, for higher speed bi-directional communication.

Want more sensors? Simply daisy chain them on an I2C port. (I usually custom make cables for specific purposes, but there are also multiplexers available which could potentially allow for over 128 i2c addressed devices on a single port). An example of a commercially available daisy chain splitter - http://www.mindsensors.com/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_page&PAGE_id=79 [mindsensors.com] . Multiplexer? http://www.hitechnic.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?preadd=action&key=NSX2020 [hitechnic.com] .

Want to control more motors? Simply add a I2C controlled motor controller - a simple circuit to make yourself, or buy one of the commercially available options. In most cases you would use these with an external power supply (i.e. battery box).

Separating "things like device power supply from device control" is as simple as making your own cables... or use some of the commercially available motor controllers. For example this motor controller (a simple i2c based DC motor controller, with lego RCX plugs in the PCB) requires an external 9v power supply - http://www.mindsensors.com/index.php?module=pagemaster&PAGE_user_op=view_page&PAGE_id=58 [mindsensors.com] .

Using USB for these purposes rather than I2C would be far more complex. I2C is very simple to use, and is fast enough for most motor and sensor IO.

Wait... what? (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514699)

64MB RAM and 16MB storage ???

That can't be right...

Seriously... it makes no sense. When is storage capacity *smaller* than ram?

The article either has it backwards, or else they meant 16gb of storage.

Re:Wait... what? (3, Interesting)

aedil (68993) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514823)

It would actually make quite a lot of sense for a custom system where the control software (essentially the OS) is provided in the srtorage component (16MB), and things like actual programs are loaded into RAM. Since typically (as far as I recall) mindstorm programs are loaded into the brick at runtime, it makes perfect sense that no storage is used for this, other than perhaps a ramdisk.

Re:Wait... what? (1)

sdsucks (1161899) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515315)

"Since typically (as far as I recall) mindstorm programs are loaded into the brick at runtime"

    -- FYI, that is not the case. The NXT's have 256KB of flash which is used for user (and OS) storage.

Re:Wait... what? (1)

Bill Currie (487) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514953)

With support for sd cards, who needs storage other than for the OS itself?

Re:Wait... what? (1)

afidel (530433) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514985)

Look at every SOHO router released in the last 10 years, small flash for OS+base programs and some ram to run code. Boot from a bzip2 image to ram drive and execute from there.

Re:Wait... what? (1)

gl4ss (559668) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515605)

why?
try programming anything?

(besides it's moot since your code would be sitting on the sd card.. but it's not unfeasible to think of plenty of things where you'd se 64mbytes and more of memory but which would take much less than 16mbytes of space in executable form).

Sweet. (1)

adolf (21054) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514759)

Does this mean that I can finally retire my venerable WRT54G?

Re:Sweet. (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42514955)

Not unless you have an external managed switch, an Ethernet access on the Brick probably via USB.

More info on the EV3 (4, Informative)

pbr (122134) | about a year and a half ago | (#42514977)

https://www.quora.com/lego_tidbits/Lego-Mindstorms-EV3-More-Info

next time on legoland (1)

slashmydots (2189826) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515031)

I have a feeling that Legos are going to beat most of the private companies into space. They'll probably outdo them on satellite launches too.

Re:next time on legoland (1)

mark-t (151149) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515101)

yup [thespec.com]

Why was it in Dutch? (1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515127)

Or maybe the question should. Be: why do Americans think Danes speak Dutch, when they infact speak Danish?

Re:Why was it in Dutch? (1)

zeptic (323902) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515461)

There is one really easy answer to that question: The article is in Dutch.

Re:Why was it in Dutch? (1)

jimshatt (1002452) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516437)

Fun fact: Denmark itself is listed as one of the emerging markets which will finally have a native language release, in addition to the already supported languages which includes Dutch.

Which ARM9 SoC? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515343)

A quick search shows no info on which SoC is used under the hood. Are there any better googler than I up to the challenge?

!adobe (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515437)

i think they meant Autodesk Inventor Publisher, right?

"servos", NOT "servo's" (3, Informative)

Fleetie (603229) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515727)

For goodness sake, I wish whoever wrote that would learn written English. Also, it's "videos", "photos", and so on.

Re:"servos", NOT "servo's" (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515909)

For goodness sake

Shouldn't that be "For goodness's sake"? ;)

Re:"servos", NOT "servo's" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516109)

For goodness sake

Shouldn't that be "For goodness's sake"? ;)

Shouldn't that be "For goodness' sake" ? ;-)

http://grammarist.com/usage/for-goodness-sake/

Re:"servos", NOT "servo's" (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516387)

According to the very page you've linked to:

We’d probably use for goodness’s sake

Now, should it be "neener neener" or "neener-neener"?

Re:"servos", NOT "servo's" (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516499)

From that very sentence you quote on that very page "the consensus among English grammar and usage authorities is in favor of for goodness’ sake."

"Neener-neener with nobs on".

Re:"servos", NOT "servo's" (1)

stefpe (256175) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516135)

For goodness sake

Shouldn't that be "For goodness's sake"? ;)

Goodness' ;)

Re:"servos", NOT "servo's" (1)

wonkey_monkey (2592601) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516397)

Why? It's not plural.

raspberry pi anyone? (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42515893)

It sounds like a job for a raspberry pi. The problem is to get mit's Scratch to play with it. I've been thinking about a way to do this for a few weeks. I

battery life (2)

MoreDruid (584251) | about a year and a half ago | (#42515917)

I hope they truly address battery life. I understand that making motors turn and sensory input costs energy but boy the NXT 2.0 eats through a pack of batteries like a pothead with munchies. In the RC world there are lots of energy efficient battery types, and for the price I think Lego should have included a decent rechargeable battery pack (NiMh, if not LiPo).

Re:battery life (1)

drinkypoo (153816) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516655)

It would be better if the brick would simply accept these new 3.7v Lithium batteries in the AA format. It's better to be able to swap batteries, to be able to buy the batteries at your supermarket, etc.

Mr giao (-1)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516155)

This article is very interesting http://xuangiao.com

New advertising technique? (1)

SigmundFloyd (994648) | about a year and a half ago | (#42516199)

1. post critical article [slashdot.org] about $product (make sure the article also contains rebuttals);
2. followup 2 weeks later with new $product announcement that proves previous criticism wrong;
3. profit!

Not necessarily carried out consciously by news aggregation sites such as this one, but possibly still orchestrated by $product's marketing dept.

New paranoia technique? (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516249)

It's hard to link a product announcement from Lego with an unrelated article from NY Times two weeks earlier. The idea that Lego stores up product announcements and then releases them two weeks after some guy somewhere writes an article about them is pretty much ridiculous.

tweakers.not (0)

Anonymous Coward | about a year and a half ago | (#42516543)

Linking to an article on a website that most people can't read is bad enough. That the article contains no more information than the various English sources is just plain stupid. Tweakers, apart from being drug addicts, is a advertisement outlet for big iron and the copyright industry.

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