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Slackware 12.0 Released

kdawson posted more than 6 years ago | from the that's-two-ahead-of-os-x dept.

Operating Systems 286

Matt writes "Straight from our good friend and colleague in the fight for quality distributions, Mr. Patrick Volkerding, comes a brand-new and eagerly-awaited release of Slackware, version 12. HAL automount, KDE 3.5.7 and XFCE 4.4.1, Xorg 7.2, 2.6 kernels as far as the eye can see, oodles of updated applications and utilities, and hardware support for just about anything under the sun. Get it here. Enjoy! I know I will."

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286 comments

The only release I consider anymore (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19724653)

Many thanks Pat. I now have something to keep me busy on July 4th holiday!

Yes, but... does it support (2, Funny)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724747)

iphone?

Re:Yes, but... does it support (-1, Flamebait)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724855)

Fuck off! I don't think I am the only one who is already sick to death of "iPhone this, iPhone that", Well, iPhone your mom!

Sorry. Nothing personal, but I just needed to let the steam out and you were the first target to present itself.

Re:Yes, but... does it support (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725033)

Woops, looks like someone forgot to check the anonymous coward checkbox....

Fuck off is OK too. (1)

EmbeddedJanitor (597831) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725517)

Well I was going for a funny by ripping off the old "does it run Linux" gag, but targetting being a bit edgy with everyone bitching about the iphone overhyping.

Edgy humor is always going to step on some toes so a few "fuck offs" is fully fine with me too since your feedback suggests I hit the mark.

If I gave you a pressure release valve in the process, thats great too.

MOD PARENT TROLL or REDUNDANT (-1)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725469)

I swear, I have seen that joke like twice a day for like a week now... It always gets +5, funny and I am really sick of it... It was funny the first few times but now it's not even original. And it's not generic like the does it run linux things? The last one I can remember was on the GPL story [slashdot.org]. Now... if only, slashdot had a search that would actually work...

Is apple paying you guys via some top-secret advertising program for slashdotters with good karma? I am already sick of having to see 3 iphone stories a day... At least leave the linux section alone!

Re:MOD PARENT TROLL or REDUNDANT (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19726073)

I think he was being ironic...

Why? (1, Troll)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724655)

Slack is great for reasons other than this..

Slack's great for setting up tight servers in which you know every program running and where it's at.
Its also go for when you know how to set up a speed-server in which you need it up in 20 minutes.

If you want to change anything past what's on the CD, go get the source for each program it requires. There's soo much time wasted on that... if you can find the sources for that specific module..

Go Debian/Ubuntu. I like my package archives.

Re:Why? (4, Informative)

SyniK (11922) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724807)

Slackware Package websites:
www.linuxpackages.net
www.slackware-current.net
(There are more, but these are easy to remember.)

They're very nice for any omissions and/or upgrades between release versions.

Re:Why? (2, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19724839)

www.slackware-current.net

is not a slackware package site it's a easyes one and that should be taken down already sicne it's a trademark violation

Re:Why? (1)

Creepy Crawler (680178) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724911)

apt-cache search ****
apt-get install ****

is much easier.

And I have access to many more archives, many more CPU/arch platforms, and 2 kernel structures to choose from.

Dont get me wrong. Slack for a barebones webserver in 20 minutes kicks ass. It just isnt great for most anything desktop oriented.

Re:Why? (2, Insightful)

PenGun (794213) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725383)

Slapt-get install ... too hard for you?

  Oh well.

  Archives, you know we all can get at em'. You do understand there are tools to use your debby stuff elsewhere deb2targz being just one. What's a kernel structure and why just 2? We tend to roll our own kernels mostly.

Re:Why? (4, Informative)

poofyhairguy82 (635386) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726455)

Slapt-get install ... too hard for you?

Yes, when it does not have what I want. Which is far too often.

Where Debian (and Ubuntu) "win" on the desktop is not because they have the best package manager tools, its because they have the most packages. I originally switched to Ubuntu back in 2004 because it was the only Linux distro (besides Debian unstable of course) that had a program I really wanted (bit tornado) in its package repository. Thanks to this huge repository and Ubuntu, I have gotten EVERY linux program I have wanted over the past three years without touching a complier. Heck, I haven't even had a compiler installed in the last year.

I know that ruins the effect of Linux for some, but compiling programs and chasing dependencies is the worst part of the OS for me (and other like minded desktop users). Each to their own...

Re:Why? (1)

SyniK (11922) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725399)

Slackware, being a one man deal, is nice to see Linux as one man's vision. No committees involved or any compromise in the design, but it doesn't have the resources for something like apt... Apt is nice.

On a desktop system how often after initial setup and configuration (a week just to be sure?) do you need apt-get? When installing something you just learned about? Maybe once a month tops? So maybe you use it for system upgrades/updates? rsync'ing slackware-current and "find . -name *.tgz -exec upgradepkg *.tgz" does a fair approximation of it.

A quote about being easy from an obscure 80's movie...
"Quicker and easier. Yes, quick and easy is how you bake a cake or clean a toilet bowl or shop, by mail. But quick and easy is not how you run a multi-million dollar business such as ours (Perret)."

Re:Why? (1)

ericrost (1049312) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725739)

Actually, I use it at least four or five times weekly. Some new package I want to mess with, some new task I want to tackle, some new server service I'm setting up.. If I had to hunt for stuff on the interwebs (the actual packages, not just info) and build it, it would slow me down. That's a big reason I use Ubuntu.. however, I'm installing slack on an old Pentium lappy with 40 MB of ram just to fart with it, all things in their place.

Re:Why? (1)

poofyhairguy82 (635386) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726571)

On a desktop system how often after initial setup and configuration (a week just to be sure?) do you need apt-get?

How about FOR the initial setup? I hate compiling new programs, whether its the first week of use for a Linux install or the 36th month. On an Ubuntu box, thanks to apt-get and scripts like Automatix I can setup a new Ubuntu box (meaning blank hard drive to a full install ready to play AVI files, Flash and do everything an average user does) in less than an hour and a half. And most of that time is waiting for packages to download and install themselves- I never have to touch a command line once to get it done anymore.

When you are big on picking up Linux converts, cutting down a two day (at least for me back in the days of compiling what I needed) process to an hour and a half is a big deal...

Re:Why? (2, Informative)

Drache Kubisuro (469932) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726271)

Don't forget http://www.slackbuilds.org/ [slackbuilds.org] !

They provide tested scripts to roll your own packages. So you know what you're getting into and that it will work with your individual Slackware installation. They've worked very hard to prepare for Slackware 12. I think they were the first, in fact, to be ready for Slack 12.

Am I the only one? (2, Insightful)

wawannem (591061) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724685)

It is a bit hard to jump back into Slackware... The long hiatus a while back left me seeking other distros which I have stayed loyal to.

Re:Am I the only one? (1)

SyniK (11922) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724873)

Yes and no.
Yes, every extended hiatus has me trying other distros to fill in the gaps (new gcc, new kde, new X, new distro-specific widget, etc)...
But I always go back to slackware-current once the gap is filled.

Re:Am I the only one? (1)

T-Bone_142 (917711) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724977)

Your not the only one i to switched away from Slackware on my desktop, but i didn't stray far. I now run (Slackware based)Zenwalk Linux [zenwalk.org] (formerly Minislack) with Zeqadious's lightweight gnome packages.

Even with Slackware no longer on hiatus i have stuck with Zenwalk because of its package management (dependency resolution), active development team and lightweight no boat design philosophy.

However i do still run Slackware 10.1 and 11 on my two test servers, and will most likely keep using it as my server distro for years to come.

Keep up the good work Patrick, you make one of the best Linux distributions around (IMO).

Re:Am I the only one? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725637)

Nope

The nice package management system in distributions like Ubuntu makes installing software even easier than in windows. I enjoy fooling around with Linux but there comes a point when time can be better spent elsewhere. I've used every version of Slackware since 3.3 until trying Ubuntu last year.

Re:Am I the only one? (5, Insightful)

DynaSoar (714234) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726283)

> It is a bit hard to jump back into Slackware... The long hiatus a while back left me seeking other distros which I have stayed loyal to.

No, you're probably not the only one. However, that opinion is the opposite as that of Jason1729 below, who states he gave it up due to too many updates and fixes, and he's probably not the only one to feel that way either. Between the two, Patrick is probably running at pretty much the right speed:

From: Patrick J. Volkerding (bf703@cleveland.Freenet.Edu)
      Subject: ANNOUNCE: Slackware Linux 1.00
      Newsgroups: comp.os.linux
      Date: 1993-07-16 17:21:20 PST

  The Slackware Linux distribution (v. 1.00) is now available for
  anonymous FTP.....

12 versions in 14 years, plus revisions between. All under his guidance. Most would have abandoned the effort sooner and with fewer releases, and probably due to doing so many in that time. Hell, most would have given up rather than rewrite it all in order to switch libraries.

Once you go Slack ... (5, Informative)

drpimp (900837) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724751)

Once you go Slack, you never go back!

Well that used to be my motto, at least for my servers. But I really just got tired of having to compile things that I could not get with slackpkg or slapt. I have switched to Debian for my servers I alleviated my headaches with compiling apps (those not included or available). Mind you if you needed something that WAS available with slackpkg or slapt then it was a great system. And even still a better system to have a locked down tight server. I would rank it up there with Gentoo in certain aspects (of course not installation).

Since I will probably quest to install Slack again someday, does anyone know if it comes with a GUI installer yet? I have not installed since Slack 10 so maybe my question is obviously dated, but it is a valid one at that!

Noooooooooo!!! Not tonight! (4, Funny)

bersl2 (689221) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724761)

I have work to do tonight! Don't make me choose between that and upgrading to 12.0!

Re:Noooooooooo!!! Not tonight! (2, Funny)

pilbender (925017) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725467)

AAAAAHHHH Damn it! I was thinking the *exact* same thing. I have to just put it out of my mind because I've got code to release tomorrow and we're down on devs by 60% :-(

I'm going to take a stand. I'm going to take charge. I'm *not* going to let the Slackware upgrade dominate my thoughts! I will fight the urge! I will write my code so I can keep my job and my house and my wife. I will make the right choice.

There! I don't feel any better and it doesn't make it okay. I still want to upgrade my Slack boxes. It's fun even after 13 years ;-)

Re:Noooooooooo!!! Not tonight! (2, Funny)

Skapare (16644) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725697)

Call in sick. You know it will make you sick if you can't get your Slack.

Re:Noooooooooo!!! Not tonight! (1)

pilbender (925017) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725765)

You know.... that's the best thing I've heard or read all day. Mod parent brilliant please.

Slak Rules (1, Informative)

PenGun (794213) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724801)

Always.

  Just tried to install the Fiesty Fawn thingy. It goes in alright but I need to be root to set the puppy up. I refuse to be crippled by some piece of .... that wants to protect me from myself. I refuse to put in my user password every damn time I want to do anything.

  It's easy to fix. Just crank in slak once again, over top of the toy.

  We'll have 12 in Slamd64 (64 bit slak) soon.

Re:Slak Rules (2, Informative)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724891)

$ sudo passwd root

Other than that, yeah Slackware is pretty fucking awesome. I gave Slack 12 (actually -current) a shot in the pre-RC stages and was pleasantly surprised. I might give this one a shot later on.

Re:Slak Rules (1)

ClaraBow (212734) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724913)

Just tried to install the Fiesty Fawn thingy. It goes in alright but I need to be root to set the puppy up. I refuse to be crippled by some piece of .... that wants to protect me from myself. I refuse to put in my user password every damn time I want to do anything.
You can always use these handy commands:
  • SU
  • SUDO

Re:Slak Rules (1, Funny)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19724929)

Yeah. My initial impression of Feisty was that it was an amazingly superior version of Windows Vista ;)

Re:Slak Rules (1)

g0dsp33d (849253) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725325)

I'm on vista now, downloading Slackware. Trying to find a *nix package that will run on my laptop without sacrificing chicken blood to get the wifi drivers working. I refuse to use dialup to fix problems with wireless.

Does anyone know the basic differences I'd notice between this and say Fedora 7 or Ubuntu?

Re:Slak Rules (2, Informative)

notamisfit (995619) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725503)

Umm, yeah, Slackware is a lot, lot harder. That's the basic difference.

While it's got it's uses, if you're new enough to have to ask what the difference is (and there's no judgment in that; we were all new once), you probably shouldn't be using it. It won't help with the wifi drivers; they're all in the kernel and Slack uses a vanilla kernel.org kernel. Honestly, if Ubuntu doesn't support the hardware in question (it includes a few non-kosher drivers for stuff like Atheros), it probably won't run on Linux period.

Re:Slak Rules (1)

cdw38 (1001587) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726309)

+1.

To the question: You should really read up (check distrowatch.com for links to various reviews of different distros) before installing (or trying to install) Slackware. My first experience with it wasn't until after 4 months of Mandrake 9, and I couldn't even get X working without IRC help. Trying to jump straight into it (without basic familiarity with the Linux kernel and environment) will be unnecessarily hard.

I suppose the best way to ultimately become familiar with Linux is to ween yourself from distros like Ubuntu and Fedora for a few months to see how things really work behind the UI curtain distros like that provide. I'm still a total *nix noob myself, and will stay that way as long as I'm too lazy to find time to play around with anything other than Ubuntu [after spending about 4 years without Linux installed (after about a year worth of Mandrake)]

So, yeah. CN: Stay away until you are at least somewhat familiar with Linux. At least that's my own view (although admittedly inexperienced as I am).

Re:Slak Rules (1)

Kjella (173770) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724933)

You do know that it's 30 seconds on google and one command to enable the root account right? How you survive on slak without basic geek problem solving skills is beyond me.

Re:Slak Rules (0, Troll)

PenGun (794213) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725141)

Yeah I'm so lame I've been root for ... woo 12 years now. No I'll just crank in slak rather than surf a menu system to allow me to be what the fuck I am.

  I keep a user account for ssh etc but at home I'm root. Here's a hint turn it off if you aint using it. Turn it on when you need it.

  The only fools who have come close to rooting me lost 3 class C networks, heh on advertising.com yet, and became friends. Don't try to root me ... just ask for an account eh'.

quick question (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725381)

Are you missing your sarcasm tags or are you really that lame?

Re:Slak Rules (1)

X0563511 (793323) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725413)

Wow, that commend there made you appear to be a lot younger than I'm sure you are.

The very idea of rooting someone is that they don't know about it. So, you only know how many times they have failed to root you.

A healthy dose of paranoia is a good thing, as long as you don't get carried away.

---- ----

Myself, I have yet to try slackware. It seems I always end up moving back to Debian. I've tried lots: redhat, fedora, suse, and gentoo. I've even played with (and had running decently) FreeBSD.

Re:Slak Rules (0, Flamebait)

PenGun (794213) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725485)

"The very idea of rooting someone is that they don't know about it. So, you only know how many times they have failed to root you."

Very true. I ran servers for years and you can tell by your traffic whether you are being used to do something you had not planned. I've caught a few people trying really hard but those advertising.com boys actually used my server. That's why I went back up the chain and took several networks from them.

  If you are so quiet I can't detect you ... then you know I don't care much. You are not impacting my machine. As I said, just ask for an account.

  Oh yeah I'm 60 this year.

Re:Slak Rules (1)

SyniK (11922) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725013)

Those that are stuck on a sudo box have adapted (as all these child posts will show)...
My particular brand of crazy is:

$ sudo bash

Re:Slak Rules (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725811)

$ cp /bin/sh sh
$ sudo chown root sh
$ sudo chmod 4755 sh

(assuming . is mode 700)

Re:Slak Rules (1)

vtcodger (957785) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726077)

***Just tried to install the Fiesty Fawn thingy. It goes in alright but I need to be root to set the puppy up. I refuse to be crippled by some piece of .... that wants to protect me from myself. I refuse to put in my user password every damn time I want to do anything.***

You can set up a root user and log into it on a real console -- or at least you can in kubuntu. It'll be just like Slackware -- sort of. I think there is a way to do a semipermanent sudo, but I don't remember what it is. In any case, I don't really see how this nonsense makes ME any more secure. All it does is impede my use of the PC. Whose computer is this, anyway?

Pretty much, I agree with you. Kubuntu lasted about two weeks before I muttered 'screw this' and installed Slackware. Particularly aggravating is that if you forget to sudo things, the programs don't necessarily tell you that they didn't do what you asked them to do. Many of them simply ignore part or all of your command.

I'm sure that there are all sorts of things wrong with Slack, but the only one that has caused me any aggravation so far is that Kcron is included in the distribution. It appears to run, but the tasks it schedules never get executed. That's because of the way Slackware schedules periodic tasks.

Re:Slak Rules (2, Informative)

swillden (191260) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726579)

Dude. You know it's trivial to set a password on the root account so that you can login as root if you want, right? If you prefer slack, that's fine (I use Debian myself), but there's absolutely nothing stopping you from making Ubuntu work the way you're used to. However, your comments make me wonder: What do you use on slack if not sudo? su? Or do you just log in and run everything as root all the time? If so, that's a bad habit and you should break it.

Slackware... ironic that it's too much effort (2, Insightful)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724887)

The problem with slackware i found was i had to find and compile every single stupid dependency out there. Some people might find it "l33t" but i would suggest they haven't had enough experience with that kind of crud to be completely over it.

if it still lacks a ports or packaging system that allows easy to update packages and conflict resolution, it's not worth the time.

Re:Slackware... ironic that it's too much effort (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19724961)

the only thing that slavckware is missing any ways is gnome dependencies everything else is there pretty much you might just find a few other programs that most distros don't include anyways

Re:Slackware... ironic that it's too much effort (1)

PenGun (794213) | more than 6 years ago | (#19724975)

Hummm you don't compile a dependency. You compile binaries that need things ... those are your dependencies. The package system works well and what part of 'upgradepg' is giving you trouble?

  Ports is a BSD thing ... I think you fishing without a hook. You know, trolling with no point.

Re:Slackware... ironic that it's too much effort (1)

timmarhy (659436) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725095)

huh, ports isn't a BSD thing there's plenty of linux distro's that use ports.

and how do i not compile a dependency? i have a program i try to compile, it errors on a missing package, i have to download said package and compile it as well. Hence i have to compile dependant packages to get the package i really want to work. and if my dependency also needs other packages to work... well you see how the whole thing spirals into a big cluster fuck.

Last i checked i found the precompiled package list to be very lacking in current versions, it also screwed up upgrades on me rendering things useless short of removing and starting again.

Re:Slackware... ironic that it's too much effort (1)

WilliamSChips (793741) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725913)

huh, ports isn't a BSD thing there's plenty of linux distro's that use ports.
No, ports is a BSD thing. You're thinking of Portage, which is used by the Linux distro Gentoo and is based off of ports.

Yay! The 2.6 Linux Kernel is finally ready! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725097)

With the release of Slackware 2.6, it is now official that the 2.6 kernel is ready to be used by just about every Linux user out there.

Hooray! No more 2.4!

Oh wait...

Old Time Rock N' Roll (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725175)

I Luv Slackware. It has the essence of what an Unix system should be, clear, pure and concise. Call me a relic, call me what you will. Say Im old-fashioned, say Im over the hill. Todays Unix ain t got the same soul I like that old time rock n roll.

Re:Old Time Rock N' Roll (1)

krelian (525362) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726341)

Don't you mean "I don't feel superior to lesser nerds if I don't use the console 100% of the time and compile everything myself"? :)

no ZFS, lame (0, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725293)

We've been testing ZFS with OpenSolaris and FreeBSD and keep getting impressed by the things it can do. Like clones, which are effectively a free copy-on-write hard link. We do a lot of zoned/jailed virtual servers. ZFS makes it easy; just set up the default install and take a snapshot of it. When we need to create a new zone, we just make a clone of the snapshot (It takes up no space and no time). As new files are added/edited, each zone has their own copy, but 90% of the files are shared, so we avoid wasting disk space. If we could do that with UML or Xen, we would. But we can't, so we don't.

Re:no ZFS, lame (1)

drsmithy (35869) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725445)

As new files are added/edited, each zone has their own copy, but 90% of the files are shared, so we avoid wasting disk space. If we could do that with UML or Xen, we would. But we can't, so we don't.

Do it exactly the same way. Install your master VM to an LV. Take [a] snapshot(s) of the LV. Use the snapshot(s) for your new VMs.

(With that said, I believe snapshots in LVM have a much greater overhead than they do in ZFS.)

Cleaning out my garage... (3, Interesting)

tgd (2822) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725295)

Cleaning out my garage a week or two ago I was going through an old box and ended up tossing a set of Slackware A floppies... That was such a refreshing change from downloading a boot disk and bootstrapping a system starting with compiling GCC.

I know its only peripherally related to the article, but man. V12 of Slackware? Time has flown, and things sure have changed.

Re:Cleaning out my garage... (1)

colmore (56499) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725521)

Cleaning out my garage a week or two ago I was going through an old box and ended up tossing a set of Slackware A floppies... That was such a refreshing change from downloading a boot disk and bootstrapping a system starting with compiling GCC.

well between the four digit user ID, and the old timer war stories, what are you up to these days? just chasing the rest of us off of your lawn, cane in fist?

Re:Cleaning out my garage... (1)

Dicky (1327) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726131)

Bah, kids of today!

And yes, until I emigrated last year, meaning a major home clear-out, I also had old floppy boxes with stacks of a*, d*, n* disks in them. I'll have to grab me a Slack 12, although I had been thinking of trying Gentoo next, for a sheer seat-of-pants setup...

Re:Cleaning out my garage... (2, Interesting)

Nimey (114278) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726143)

It hasn't been that many versions. Patrick skipped from v4 to v7 because IIRC Redhat at the time was v7, and so was Mandrake.

Re:Cleaning out my garage... (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19726583)

This is true. It sounds sleazy unless you tell the whole story. Basically it was a joke and Patrick was completely up-front about it. The release notes said something like: "The other major distros are all at version 6 now and I got tired of everyone asking me when Slackware 6 was coming out. So I bumped the version number from 4 to 7. Sorry. I won't do it again (unless everyone else does it again)."

Patrick's sense of humor adds a nice touch to a great distro.

And I just got around to installing 11 (1)

Tmack (593755) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725301)

To my new hardware! At least I was still burning it in and hadnt put too much into configuring it yet. Time to flush and reload once again!

tm

Re:And I just got around to installing 11 (2, Informative)

pilbender (925017) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725677)

What the heck!? Slackware makes it very easy to upgrade versions. I haven't had to do a fresh install on *any* computers once I put Slackware on them initially. There are a couple of docs included on the distro to help with upgrading. You should follow those and learn how to do it. You can also tar up Slack and move it to a different hard disk. No need to ever reinstall Slackware.

I highly recommend building confidence in the upgrade process. This way you will never have to worry about reconfiguring your systems or losing your data. There's no need to restore from backup and there's no need for your system to be down for more than a few minutes.

I don't know whether you do it or not but you should consider keeping a text log or a list or something of configuration changes in case you ever need to do it again. Mine is about 20 pages long but that's because I've customized or installed just about everything in creation at one time or another ;-)

So... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725359)

How many floppies this time around?

A special message to Patrick Volkerding (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725451)

Brush your teeth. And don't forget to floss.

*BSD is Dying (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725519)

It is now official. Netcraft confirms: *BSD is dying

One more crippling bombshell hit the already beleaguered *BSD community when IDC confirmed that *BSD market share has dropped yet again, now down to less than a fraction of 1 percent of all servers. Coming on the heels of a recent Netcraft survey which plainly states that *BSD has lost more market share, this news serves to reinforce what we've known all along. *BSD is collapsing in complete disarray, as fittingly exemplified by failing dead last [samag.com] in the recent Sys Admin comprehensive networking test.

You don't need to be the Amazing Kreskin [amazingkreskin.com] to predict *BSD's future. The hand writing is on the wall: *BSD faces a bleak future. In fact there won't be any future at all for *BSD because *BSD is dying. Things are looking very bad for *BSD. As many of us are already aware, *BSD continues to lose market share. Red ink flows like a river of blood.

FreeBSD is the most endangered of them all, having lost 93% of its core developers. The sudden and unpleasant departures of long time FreeBSD developers Jordan Hubbard and Mike Smith only serve to underscore the point more clearly. There can no longer be any doubt: FreeBSD is dying.

Let's keep to the facts and look at the numbers.

OpenBSD leader Theo states that there are 7000 users of OpenBSD. How many users of NetBSD are there? Let's see. The number of OpenBSD versus NetBSD posts on Usenet is roughly in ratio of 5 to 1. Therefore there are about 7000/5 = 1400 NetBSD users. BSD/OS posts on Usenet are about half of the volume of NetBSD posts. Therefore there are about 700 users of BSD/OS. A recent article put FreeBSD at about 80 percent of the *BSD market. Therefore there are (7000+1400+700)*4 = 36400 FreeBSD users. This is consistent with the number of FreeBSD Usenet posts.

Due to the troubles of Walnut Creek, abysmal sales and so on, FreeBSD went out of business and was taken over by BSDI who sell another troubled OS. Now BSDI is also dead, its corpse turned over to yet another charnel house.

All major surveys show that *BSD has steadily declined in market share. *BSD is very sick and its long term survival prospects are very dim. If *BSD is to survive at all it will be among OS dilettante dabblers. *BSD continues to decay. Nothing short of a miracle could save it at this point in time. For all practical purposes, *BSD is dead.

Fact: *BSD is dying

Does that mean Patrick isn't sick anymore? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725551)

I hope he's feeling better these days.

Still too much work? (1)

Jason1729 (561790) | more than 6 years ago | (#19725767)

I used slackware on my desktop for many years (I started with 2.3 and kernel 1.0.8). A few years ago I decided it was just too much trouble, between regularly updating the kernal for security patchs (involving recompiling, redoing lilo, etc) and other system maintence, I was spending more time administering my system than using it.

Are things that different with linux now? (I'm not bashing slackware here, I tried many distros and always found slackware to be the best)

Re:Still too much work? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19726121)

Most other distros are much more automatic in the initial configurations. After that bit, I don't see much difference between them at all...

Slackware, as expected, remains much the same.

My knob only goes up to 11 (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 6 years ago | (#19725987)

I got it from a Spinal Tap charity auction.

Version 12, wow.... I remember Slack in Dr. Dobbs. (2, Interesting)

tjstork (137384) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726055)

Back then, they touted Linux as having 50,000 users!

Timing is everything. (1)

armanox (826486) | more than 6 years ago | (#19726249)

*Sigh* Right when I get Gentoo running on my desktop too. I think I'm just gonna give slackware it's own HDD this time. Although I may need to wait to upgrade my desktop until the nVidia driver updates. I'd install on my laptop, but I just got all of the drivers (networking aside) working right. Perhaps my server (running Ubuntu 6.06) is candidate for Slackware?
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