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New Ubuntu Foundation Announced

Zonk posted more than 9 years ago | from the ubuntu-brings-best-wishes-for-everybody! dept.

Linux Business 315

AccUser writes "Mark Shuttleworth and Canonical Ltd, founders of the popular Ubuntu Linux-based operating system, have today announced the creation of The Ubuntu Foundation with an initial funding commitment of US$10m. From the article: 'The Ubuntu Foundation will employ core Ubuntu community members to ensure that Ubuntu will remain fully supported for an extended period of time, and continue to produce new releases of the distribution. As a first step, the Foundation announces that Ubuntu version 6.04, due for release in April 2006, will be supported for three years on the desktop and five years on the server.'"

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Umbongo? (-1, Offtopic)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013055)

Which fanboy are you?
  1. Windows

    You wear wraparound sunglasses, even indoors. You wish your mother would let you ride a motorbike. You tell your friends you're pulling in $50,000 a year and $2,000 a month "playing the stock market" but in reality you're only bringing in half that and your dividends from MSFT havn't been good in years. Your non computing friends all turn to you for help; you only charge $30 an hour. Your collegues talk about you behind your back. Your workplace nickname is likely to be "The Asshole". Unlike the Linux fanboys, you actually try to pick up dates in bars but women laugh at you.
  2. Apple

    You think you're so cool you hurt. You have mirrors on every wall in your "loft apartment", which is really a grimy little apartment next to a guy who plays Guns 'n Roses at 3am. All of your furniture is from Ikea. You sometimes think that changing your name to "Steve" would be "pretty cool". When you go to bars you only drink Miller Lite. No body ever asks you for help with their computers because they know you don't know anything but OS X, even if you do tell them you "run Unix" now. Your friends openly laugh at you.
  3. Linspire

    You regularly give $10 bills to homeless guys because you have too much money. Computers baffle you, but you enjoy looking at pictures of naked women. You don't know what Linux is, but you continually bugged the IT guy at work about your computer so he installed Linspire on your machine.
  4. Umbongo

    You shop at GAP. You probably used to use a Mac. When you saw the multiracial image used as a desktop picture and heard that this operating system came from the same country as Nelson Mandela, you knew it was for you. You meet with your friends in fair-trade coffee houses and talk about the eventual overthrow of evil corporations such as Microsoft and Starbucks. Like the Linspire user, you have very little real knowlege when it comes to computers but you would never use your computer to look at pictures of women degrading themselves.
  5. Gentoy

    You've been "into computers" for ohh, one or two years now and fancy yourself as "a bit of a hacker". Wouldn't know C from C++, or even Perl for that matter. Older Gentoy users may be building their homes from matchsticks. You've explained to all your friends that your matchstick house will have an "optimised floorplan". They've tried to tell you that your house violates every known building code and law in your area, but you've ignored them so far because you can't read those complicated regulatory documents.
  6. Linux From Scratch

    Much like the Gentoy user but you'd also be into sadomasochistic sex if you could get it. You're not just building a house from matchsticks, you're planing to grow the trees to make the matchsticks. You've cleared some land but don't know what to do next because you havn't read the books you've got, so you've posted to alt.arborists.newbie asking for help. It's been three days so far and no one has replied. You remain hopeful.

It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (0, Redundant)

IRNI (5906) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013075)

They offer CD's on their site and say they will send out as many as you want. They seem to encourage you ordering lots since it costs the same to mail one as it does 20. I thought this was great. I could hand them out to people. Well I never got them. It has been months. I understand they might have some problems since it is a non-profit or whatever... but I guess I relied on their offer too much. Hopefully they are getting better.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (4, Informative)

rylin (688457) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013085)

Not sure why yours weren't sent out, but mine definitely were.
I ordered 20 x86 versions and 15 x86_64 versions, and they arrived in a semi-timely manner.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (1)

Directrix1 (157787) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013118)

It took a couple of months for mine to get here, but they did come eventually. I ordered about 30.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013194)

mine were sent also within a month! And I'm in Argentina (near the end of the world)

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (2, Informative)

softends (886321) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013111)

I received all 30 of the 5.04 CD's I ordered within a month

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (2, Informative)

NicodemusPrime (836605) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013150)

Mine took a couple months to arrive. I finally got them last week from somewhere in the Netherlands. I've been handing them out and people seen happier to get an actual pressed cd set rather than CD-Rs.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (2, Informative)

selfabuse (681350) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013158)

someone at my office ordered 10 of them about 3 months ago, and they did take a while to get here, but they showed up last week. Obviously, YMMV, but don't give up quite yet - they still may show up.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (1)

mc clown (884500) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013227)

I ordered some a few months ago and they only arrived last week...the reason that I was told was because they were changin over to 5.04 from 5.03 and had to press a load of new cd's

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (1)

PeteDotNu (689884) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013342)

"they were changin over to 5.04 from 5.03"

The Ubuntu numbering system doesn't work quite like that. 4.10 actually corresponds to 2004 October, which was the previous version. 5.04 is 2005 April. The next version will be 5.10 (October this year).

They might be on the way (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013284)

I ordered 5.04 CD's when 5.04 was released...didn't get them until about 2 weeks ago.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (2, Interesting)

grim42 (800577) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013288)

I heard from someone on the Ubuntu forums that the reason for delays is that they have had over 1 million orders for CDs.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (2, Informative)

makohill (683440) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013300)

It sounds like perhaps your order got lost in the mail or something. Why don't you email info@shipit.ubuntu.com and ask to be resend CDs. We are shipping thousands of orders a week and the vast majority are arriving without problem.

dodgy delivery appears standard for "free" OS's (1)

museumpeace (735109) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013321)

additional data point: I ordered the new OpenBSD CDs and a T-shirt [I am such a tourist!] the day their puffy write-up hit /. It was a month before they showed up...from Alberta .CA not Berkely, CA.
Amazon.com these guys are not.

When I downloaded Mepis, I paid a bit extra for the high speed ... that is the way to go if you have the bandwidth and want your "free" OS PDQ.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (1)

Grey Ninja (739021) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013335)

Yeah, I hear that. I ordered about 15 CDs about 5 months ago, and never recieved a single one. I checked the status last month, and it was marked as pending or something... don't quite remember.

Re:It would be nice if they actually sent out CD's (1)

natron 2.0 (615149) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013339)

Give it time, mine just arrived the other day. It took them so long to send them that I forgot I had ordered them, so it was a nice surprise in the mail.

I got 8 x86 disks, 1 PPC disk, and 1 AMD64 disk.

the AMD 64 was the only one I really wanted, but I was able to pass out all the others...

This is exactly what is needed (5, Insightful)

Manan Shah (808049) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013081)

I am very impressed by Ubuntu ease of use, and even more, by their commitment. When you have such an active community and big money behind such a project, it has a very good chance to succeed. It is amazing how much the folks at Ubuntu pay attention to minor usability issues.

If Linux ever becomes mainstream, it will be because of distributions like Ubuntu.

I see a problem (2, Insightful)

MountainMan101 (714389) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013211)

Ubuntu is limited by Debian's progress.

They freeze a version of Sid. Then make it really stable, then release it. More Ubuntu developers != more Debian progress.

Ubuntu is built of Debian and therefore if Debian continues to worsen it will be a bad thing for Ubuntu. This is why it is one reason all those thousand of Debian based distros are bad, too man developers doing the same thing - polishing a frozen Debian release for their own distro.

Hopefully, Ubuntu and Debian can become closer linked and Ubuntu fund Debian developers.

Re:I see a problem (1)

tankenator (803647) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013455)

Ubuntu seems to be driving Debian, not the other way around. While based on Debian, it is by far not limited to sid et. al. as they take their own road with packages to use and not... While I use another distro, I have used Ubuntu, and can say that it was fairly complete for what it is.

Re:I see a problem (3, Informative)

forlornhope (688722) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013496)

You are wrong wrong wrong. Ubuntu doesn't freeze sid. They work on packages. In fact durring the Hoary dev cycle you could see packages that were in Ubuntu that were no where near in Debian. Ubuntu Main is developed by Ubuntu developers in colaboration with Debian developers. What you are thinking of is the Universe, and even that is becoming less as the Masters of the Universe get up and running.

Ubuntu is a Debian derivative, but they are not mooching off of Debian. Ubuntu is providing value to its users and Debian. If you look at the Debian Gnome 2.10 packages, you see Ubuntu finger prints all over it.

Also Debian is not worsening. Its changing. THe project has become too large for the old, informal ways to work. Debian is evolving and though there are growing pains, its getting better. With the rise of teams and more formalization, Debian is looking healthier and healthier every day. They finally released Sarge, and now it looks as though Etch will be out in a timely manner.

Seriously, Debian isn't sick, its just changing. Ubuntu and Debian also already work very well together. Reference the Gnome 2.10 packages and the upcoming switch of debian to xorg. Both have Ubuntu Developers deeply involved because they are also Debian Developers and as Ubuntu Developers have already gone through it.

Would it be racist? (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013086)

To say that Ubuntu looks totally ghetto?

Oh crikey, not another one! (4, Insightful)

Willeh (768540) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013087)

Ok, so now we have Ubuntu, Gentoo, Suse, Red hat, Mandriva, colinux, Yellow dog, Caldera and god knows who else vying for a slice of an ever so slowly growing pie, not even counting Brazilian, Chinese, Japanese or german national efforts.

Isn't it time that some of those efforts were combined to get some kind of weight behind Linux as a whole, or are companies like IBM and Novell already moving into their respective trenches when linux on the {Desk, lap, floor}top takes off? While i can understand these companies having their own distro as has been traditionally the case, but do we REALLY need another non-profit foundation that thinks it can topple the 800 pound Red Gorilla on it's own while trying to reinvent the wheel and juggling a mix of community support and paid support? I'm not trying to be an anti-linux jerk, i'm just wondering what Ubuntu has to offer that isn't in another distro already.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (5, Funny)

justforaday (560408) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013110)

Yes, if we could just get them all working together on some sort of United Linux, all of our problems would be solved...

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (4, Interesting)

AccUser (191555) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013154)

But isn't this a symptom of open source software, in that everybody is able to do it their way? With M$ and Apple, we get an operating system that works the way they want it to. With GNU/Linux, you get to choose a distribution which works the way you want it to. And if you can't find one that does that exactly, you have the opportunity to do it yourself.

Obviously in the real-world (!) we all just want something that works the way we want it to, without having to scratch around every distribution. Personally, I think that Ubuntu [ubuntu.com] does it for me.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

Pros_n_Cons (535669) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013338)

Yes having it "their way" is a nice option but who do you think gets more money the Resturant that makes great steaks or Fast food. If Linux wants a larger chunk of the market its going to have to reach more people. And that means simple.. not 47 different choices which none work the same. A standard base isn't even a solution we just flat out need less distro's IMO.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013517)

hate to break it to you, but they both do, depending on the situation.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (4, Insightful)

Otter (3800) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013163)

On the contrary, what you're talking about was the situation in 2002.

Today, things have basically contracted to Ubuntu, Gentoo, Novell/SuSe, Debian and Mandrake on the desktop and the Red Hat family and Debian on the server. The other desktop distros (Turbo, Caldera, Lycoris, Xandros, Lindows/Linwhatever, and the rest) have mostly faded. In the next few years Ubuntu will cannibalize the remaining Debian desktop share, and Mandrake has been spinning its wheels since version 7. The consolidation you're looking for has already happened -- remaining niche players like Yellow Dog don't affect the overall picture.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (5, Insightful)

The Warlock (701535) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013196)

You forgot Fedora, which has a very large desktop share, and Slackware, which is still popular. And SuSe sees some popularity on servers. It's still pretty complicated. Not that this is nessessarily a bad thing, as others have said.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (-1, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013217)

But if you throw in the different package management, default/supported desktop, and so on you basically no longer have a short list but a confusing and new user hostile grid of choices.

Thankfully you didn't include Slackware as even a choice. Hopefully that distro will just fucking die finally.

I can't think of anything that has caused more problems for potential Linux users than the one in every crowd clown who 'has to throw his props in for Slackware' when people are trying to nail down which distro they should download and install.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

Garwulf (708651) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013378)

Well, I wouldn't really discount Xandros or Linspire yet - right now, they're actually two of the higher profile desktop Linux distros, from what I can tell. And, it's too early to tell what will be the result of the merger between Mandrake and Lycoris.

I just wish somebody would bloody well advertise the stuff properly. I keep seeing ads for Windows on the TV set - where are the ads for Linux? Surely SOMEBODY has enough money to put out at least a couple of ads to raise awareness...

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (2, Interesting)

poopdeville (841677) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013169)

Most of the distros you mentioned are designed to fill a particular niche. Ubuntu is designed as a user friendly Debian-based distro (meaning, it uses apt-get and not RPMs or some other scheme). Gentoo is for the ricers. Suse and Redhat are for the enterprise. Mandriva is an easy to use RPM based distro. Yellow Dog is a lame RPM based distro for PPC machines. The Brazilian, Chinese, Japanese, and German distros are for people who speak Portuguese, Chinese, Japanese, and German, respectively. Caldera is dead. See, they all fill a niche.

Huh? Terminology please (1)

Gramaton Cleric (853219) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013421)

I am wanting to learn more prior to entering the Linux world, but without doing a Google search, can you please explain/tell me what is the difference between apt-get and RPMs??
Also what is a "ricers"?

Thanks for the explanation.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

arose (644256) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013463)

Actualy apt-get can work with an RPM backend.

Perhaps they could merge (4, Funny)

sczimme (603413) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013199)


Ok, so now we have Ubuntu, Gentoo, Suse, Red hat, Mandriva, colinux, Yellow dog, Caldera

If they merged we could have UbunTuseYellowCoDrivaDeraDogHat.

If nothing else the domains should be readily available.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (4, Informative)

Mad_Rain (674268) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013208)

Isn't it time that some of those efforts were combined to get some kind of weight behind Linux as a whole

Mandriva was doing pretty good about your request, merging Mandrake, Connectiva, and Lycoris... It seems to be more aimed at the desktop than the server, although Mandrake has good server products too.

However, after being a Mandrake user for 3 years, I switched to Ubuntu for its easy install and upgrade path, in addition to maintaining more recent software. I hope that Ubuntu abosorbs some Debian distrobutions (Knoppix, knoppmyth, etc.), while maintaining their simplicity.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (2, Insightful)

germ!nation (764234) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013222)

What it is trying to do (from what I can see) is work with what is available now and turn it into a superior user experience from install through to every day use. This is where most distros fail. They assume the user will jump through hoops to get the benefits of a stable desktop.

News flash: they wont.

Most users only care that their desktop works for 1-3hrs some evenings and weekends, not weeks of uptime, so they don't always have the problems with stability that more demanding users encounter.

They don't want to go through a list of thousands of badly named packages working out which ones are the best web/email/word processing.

They certainly don't want to ever have to know what a dependency is.

Also, shockingly for the KDE fanboys, not everyone gives a shit about buttons that look like glass or gel, they want an interface that feels organised and sensible which, though I was a long term Gnome hater, I feel Gnome has matured to a lot faster than KDE who seem to be purely focused on blue skies rather than perfecting what they have.

I have never been as keen to switch my laptop to linux since I've had Ubuntu installed as a VM (though as it auto configured to the screen of my laptop I can run it full screen with no noticable performance degredation compared to the host OS which is WinXP so I can indulge my WoW addiction).

To sum up, I guess, it has a maturity of approach, and this is the single thing that means 99% of other distros will fall by the way-side

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

symbolic (11752) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013351)


While I understand your point, I don't think the distro has much to do with the way in which a given GUI toolkit is used. Gnome can be abused every bit as much as KDE. It all boils down to whether or not the contributors to open source software are willing to go the extra milw when it comes to how they set up their UI.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013229)

You forgot Slackware, you jerk :p

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013241)

What Ubuntu has to offer is a very nice user friendly up to date version of Debian with access to all of Debian's packages built for Ubuntu. After using other distros such as Redhat and Mandrake, while being nice, I was soon frustrated by dependencie problems when tring to install or compile some obscure package that I wanted to run.
With access to over 16000 packages when enabling the Universe and Multiverse repositories, it is easy to install those using Synaptic. Since Debian stable doesn't update very often, Ubuntu is much more up to date with packages being released every 6 months (and easy to up date) in conjunction with Gnome releases. Of course you can be more up to date if you run Debian Unstable, but that is not meant for the masses. The only other distros that come close to the number of packages as Debian is FreeBSD (not linux though but nice also) and Suse. Really I think if you want to run GNU/Linux, a Debian base one like Ubuntu (or Knoppix or SimplyMepis) is the only way to go for convenience of the largest choice and ease of installation of prebuilt packages. For x86, AMD64, and PPC I don't know what any other distro could offer that I'd want to use anything other than a Debian based one for GNU/Linux or FreeBSD if I wanted a BSD based system. Really, everyone else is just reinventing the wheel in my opinion.
73 de w0uhf

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

Pros_n_Cons (535669) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013263)

I agree. Mr. Money bags of Ubuntu would have been better off putting money behind Fedora (like helping to fund the fedora legacy project) It would not be a duplicate of work yet the OS have the same goals. Now he's in competition with a company that invests 20 fold what he does, have many of the top developers and most of the mind share. Eventually one man with one bank account wont be able to compete with a billion dollar company that continues to improve with each release.

Why does every country and every idea _need_ to fork a distro? Debian stable, Gentoo, and fedora should be the only free distros (other than nitch players that do specific things of course). Almost everything is covered under these three. Only keeping SuSE and RedHat to compete for the money market (always have atleast two when it comes to money market)

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013327)

Why would anyone support Fedora? It's a bastardized child of RH fuckers. I wish RH & Fedora would die.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

Pros_n_Cons (535669) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013444)

why support Fedora? Cause its got more new technology than any other distro, point blank. what out now has selinux with over 80 daemons protected, exec shield, GFS, xen, gcc 4 with many more security protections, GCJ, nativly compiled eclipse. I could go on but you get the idea. Fedora doesn't just package things, alot of the new things it does are written from scratch by the people working on the project. Gentoo is the only thing that comes close in terms of new tech but they are very different systems and goals.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

stm2 (141831) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013386)

Why does every country and every idea _need_ to fork a distro?

Some countries / or smalltows make their own distros because they prefer to support a "home made" project than a forein one. I know that at the end it is an International project, but it "feels" like made in X (where X is the country in question). Hardware compatibility is another issue. In Southamerica we have another hardware not found elsewhere. Sure, most top US brand hw are available, but mid/low-range hw are characteristic of a region. Low cost Winmodems found here (in Argentina) are the same that you could find in Brasil, but not in the US or Europe. Even top brands like HP have models for different markers. So, to have a local succesful distro you have to make or bundle the drivers for the local available hardware.


Debian stable, Gentoo, and fedora should be the only free distros
For "normal users", Ubuntu is not something that cames out of Debian. Ubuntu has it own menues and Desktop (among other things), so for average user is pretty different from Debian.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013503)

Debian stable, Gentoo, and fedora should be the only free distro

Doesn't Ubuntu have its roots in Debian? Why should we ditch Mandrake or Slackware? I happen to like Mandrake a lot.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

SocietyoftheFist (316444) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013285)

It has already happened. Why do you think you see major players certifying Redhat or SUSE as their platforms of choice? The Linux distro game is for the little guy, Enterprises ignore them.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (2, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013352)

Isn't it time that some of those efforts were combined to get some kind of weight behind Linux as a whole

Yeah, and isn't it about time that Mac OS X, OpenBSD, FreeBSD, Darwin, and NetBSD all consolidated their efforts? After all, they are all BSD.

Yeah, and isn't it about time that Linux, FreeBSD, Solaris and SCO Server all consolidated their efforts? After all, they are all UNIX.

Yeah, and isn't it about time that Linux, Mac OS X and Windows all consolidated their efforts? After all, they are all POSIX compliant.

At some point, you have to recognise that just because they share a buzzword or common code, it doesn't mean they are the same. Linux distributions are different. Saying "why don't the Ubuntu guys just join another distribution?" is like saying "why don't the Mac OS X guys just join the FreeBSD team?". They are different systems with different goals. Furthering the "Linux" effort is nonsensical as Linux is just a kernel. It is useless on its own and is only important in context of a larger system.

Re:Oh crikey, not another one! (1)

rainman_bc (735332) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013479)

See, you've got different markets listed there. Yellow Dog is pretty much redhat for PPC.

Suse and Redhat are going after the enterprise market, and are out to profit by providing enterprise level support.

Lycoris and Linspire seek to take over the desktop market.

Ubuntu and Gentoo are free, open distros, and AFAIK Gentoo isn't really something that's commercially available....

Caldera - isn't that SCO??? Do they even matter?

It's all about choice my friend.

Great News (5, Interesting)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013095)

IMO Ubuntu is the distro most likely to break out into the main stream. I recently switched from Gentoo and can personally attest to the simplicity and ease of use of Ubuntu. The typical non-nerd doesn't want a command line; doesn't want to compile a custom kernel; doesn't know what "compiling" means. Ubuntu is perfect for the mainstream, and a guarantee that the project will continue is great news.

Long live Ubuntu! (And Kubuntu too)

Re:Great News (2, Interesting)

KiroDude (853510) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013162)

I can only agree.... I propose to install Kubuntu to any friends/relatives computer I can get my hands on .. none of them has ever come back to Windows .. I've recently installed kubuntu on my work laptop and detected everything, even the PCMCIA wireless card at the first try... Simply excellent. If it continues its path it'll be a serious contender to windows.

Re:Great News (2, Interesting)

Tanaka (37812) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013287)

I recently installed Ubuntu. I have been using Gentoo for a few years, mostly on server boxes. Sure it installed smoothly, but once it was up and running, finding all the applications I needed was not so easy. I like the fact that just about everything you need can be found in Portage, and you know that even though it may be a bit slow to install, it will work (mostly!). Gentoo's online community seem a lot more clued up on stuff too.

Re:Great News (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013368)

Of course, the typical user doesn't want to play MP3s either.

Developers, What?? (2, Interesting)

ciroknight (601098) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013507)

My biggest critique of Ubuntu is that it seems to almost handicap anyone who wants to be a software developer.

While yes, we can grep through apt-cache and try to find all of the development packages we need, why can't they just provide a pseudo-package "ubuntu-devel" that has everything (gcc, make and friends, gtk2 dev libraries and docs, etc) wrapped up into a neat little package? This is one of the things I loved about UserLinux that hasn't quite made it into Ubuntu yet.

Happy to hear it (5, Interesting)

bad_outlook (868902) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013096)

I'm very happy that Ubuntu has come out of the gate, and done everything right. Since I've been using linux (1998) I've never seen any company so behind Linux as Cannonical have been, and I have a good feeling about this. Funny thing is, yesterday I just recieved my free Ubuntu cds; I 'ordered' 15 x86 versions, and 6 powerpc versions. I'm giving them to friends to try the 'live' option, and dropping them off at coffee cafe's, music stores and colleges. It's a good time to be using free software, and I think it can only HELP the world in coming together.

Re:Happy to hear it (1, Insightful)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013177)

Since I've been using linux (1998) I've never seen any company so behind Linux as Cannonical have been
Well, I heard once about some company with a Red Hat, though I doubt they really cared much or contributed to Linux in any meaningful way. Ah, they probably were just some kind of fly-by-night company.

Re:Happy to hear it (2, Interesting)

bad_outlook (868902) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013310)

though I doubt they really cared much or contributed to Linux in any meaningful way.

Point, somewhat taken, as I started on Red Hat 5.0 - but I never felt they had a connection with the users like Ubuntu/Cannoncial has had, they always felt like a big company *trying* to be what OSS compaines should be. I feel Ubuntu is the real deal, and I stand by my statement.

Gramps (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013103)

Grampa's ugly breath is filling my throat and I can't scream cuz his tongue is in my mouth, and I can't get away cuz he's so heavy on top of me and he's holding me down. He has a big hand on my chest, just above my titties and I can't hardly breathe.

Just now I thought he was gonna let me go cuz he shifted his hips offa me, but instead he reached with his other hand and tore my dress right down the front.

My pretty dress is all ruint. What can I tell momma?

His hand is squirming around at my cunny now. He's not kissing me any more and I started to scream, but he smacked my jaw and tole me to keep quiet. I saw stars, I swear, he hit me that hard. He tole me I was a little
slutwhore, sashayin around in my tight dress. He's pokin at my cunny with his big ole gnarly finger. I don't want him to, he hurts me when he does that, but he thinks I like it cuz my cunny gets wet and drools for him.

I hate it. I hate him and I hate it and I hate my cunny for drooling on him. I want to kill him one day.

Now he says I'm ready for him. He smiles like the devil, just a hateful grin like he thinks he knows everything and everything is for him. I pull my legs closed, but he grabs my knees and pulls them apart so hard it hurts, then he flops down between them so I can't get them together again.

He's kneelin in between my legs, pushin that ugly white wormy pecker of his at my pussy. He says he likes it when I fight him cuz it makes my cunt squeeze him better. I can feel the knobby head go up inside me, and I scream at
him to take it out. He slaps me again. "Just take it, bitch," he tells me. "Just lie back like the little slutwhore you are and take this pecker. You know you like it, look at all that cunt-slobber, you little whore."

I'm not agonna cry. I'm gonna kill him one day. I keep telling myself that. I tell myself so many times I start to think I might be saying it out loud. I don't care if he knows.

Then I feel it happening. Oh, God, don't let it happen,please...

But God doesn't hear me. God doesn't listen to
slutwhores, and I can feel the heat of my hate building inside me, making me cum. I can feel the cum growing up inside me like fire. I cling to him. I don't want to, honest I don't, but my body wants me to cum and it won't do what I tell it to do. I tell it not to cum, not to do
this to me, but it won't stop. I can feel my back arching up. I can feel my hips moving to meet his. I can feel my cunt aching to swallow his ugly cock inside it. I can feel the wall of heat rise up and fall down on me,
squashing me like a bug, and I shudder cuz I like it. I like it and it makes me want to puke. I hate him and I like what happens when he does this. I hate him for it. I'm gonna kill him.

I hate the way he grunts and groans on top of me like some kind of pasty-white mutant hog rutting, and I hate the way he always stinks so much of sour beer and sweat.

Then he grunts real deep and I feel his jizz dribbling inside me. He rolls off of me. I curl up with my back to him. I don't want him to see me cry. I don't want him to
see how ugly I am. I don't want him to see what a little slutwhore he's made me into. I don't want him to see how he's made my body into my enemy...

A LITERARY TOUR DE FORCE! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013389)

Critics concur---"Gramps" is an indie masterpiece. "Truly an American icon," remarked Gary Niger, as he zipped up his fly.

Before it is /.ed (1, Informative)

AccUser (191555) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013112)

LAUNCH OF $10m UBUNTU FOUNDATION

08 July 2005

Mark Shuttleworth and Canonical Ltd, founders of the popular Ubuntu
Linux-based operating system, have today announced the creation of The
Ubuntu Foundation with an initial funding commitment of US$10m.

The Ubuntu Foundation will employ core Ubuntu community members to
ensure that Ubuntu (www.ubuntu.com) will remain fully supported for an
extended period of time, and continue to produce new releases of the
distribution. As a first step, the Foundation announces that Ubuntu
version 6.04, due for release in April 2006, will be supported for
three years on the desktop and five years on the server.

The Foundation was established on July 1st 2005 with an initial
funding commitment of US$10 million, to ensure the continuity of the
Ubuntu project and create a legal vehicle that represents the
community structures of the project.

"It's important for us to distinguish the philanthropic and
non-commercial work that is at the heart of the Ubuntu project, from
the commercial support and certification programs that are the focus
of Canonical Ltd." said Mark Shuttleworth, who is founder of the
project and is making the initial $10m commitment to the
Foundation. "The core team members employed by the Ubuntu Foundation
will ensure that we can meet public commitments to keep Ubuntu
entirely free of charge, as well as meeting commitments of support for
extended periods. I'm very excited at the progress that has been made
in bringing free software to the global marketplace, and pleased to
continue my support for the project in this way."

Ubuntu has quickly become a leading distribution in the free software
world, taking the #1 place in DistroWatch popularity rankings over all
timescales which are published. The distribution focuses on usability,
security and stability on desktops and servers, and on making free
software widely available for individuals and organisations who are
ready to switch from proprietary platforms, such as Microsoft Windows.

Ubuntu has also become the basis of many other derivative
distributions, particularly those backed by govenments for widespread
deployment. The government of Andalucia, Spain recently announced that
its own version of Linux would be based on Ubuntu, and deployed in all
educational operations.

LONGER SERVER SUPPORT CYCLE

One driving factor behind the creation of the Foundation was the need
to ensure that an Ubuntu release can be deployed on servers, which
demand much slower release and upgrade cycles. "In order to support
the use of free software on database and other servers, we will be
offering security support for the Ubuntu base and major server
components for a full five years", said Matt Zimmerman, CTO of the
Ubuntu project.

As Ubuntu and free software in general become more mainstream, it has
become costly for companies and large organisations to keep track of
the rapid pace of development. In the desktop environment the problem
is more manageable, and steady improvements in the usability of
desktop office and productivity applications have been welcomed. In
the datacenter, however, where Linux and free software are considered
mature, deployments have a preference for fewer releases with long
lifecycles. Ubuntu version 6.04, to be released in April 2006, will be
aimed at meeting those requirements with a full five year commitment
to provide security and other critical updates for servers. This also
meets the needs of OEM distribution providers and ISVs, who have
expressed strong interest in supporting free software environments but
who prefer to be able to plan for releases and support them for longer
periods of time.

The extended service support for Ubuntu version 6.04 will remain free
of charge, under the same terms as the support currently provided to
every release of Ubuntu. The extended service support program will
only apply to designated releases of Ubuntu. Other releases, which
will still be made on the current six-month cycle, will continue to
receive the current commitment of 18 months free security and critical
updates support.

KEEPING FREE SOFTWARE FREE

A primary goal of the Ubuntu Foundation is to ensure that a high
quality distribution of free and open source software is available
free of charge, throughout the world. "Free software is produced by
expert volunteers who make their time and work freely available - our
goal is to ensure that anybody in the world can make the best use of
that work, at no charge." said Benjamin Mako Hill, Ubuntu Community
Relations. Both Canonical and the Ubuntu Foundation have made public
commitments that Ubuntu will always be freely available, without the
need for royalties or licence payments of any kind. "We include only
free and unencumbered applications, ensuring that users have the
ability to share and modify their software."

CONTINUED SUPPORT FROM CANONICAL LTD.

The establishment of the Ubuntu Foundation enhances the commercial
commitment already made to the Ubuntu project by Canonical, Ltd.
"Demand for the commercial services offered by Canonical to users of
Ubuntu continues to grow. We welcome the very large number of
companies that have announced support for Ubuntu both regionally and
globally, and expect to continue to create additional partnership,
certification and support programs in coming months," stated Jane
Silber, head of marketing at Canonical.

The extended life support program for Ubuntu version 6.04 is in line
with Canonical's efforts to broaden the OEM base for Ubuntu. "The
distribution has been selected by several hardware manufacturers for
sale with PCs and laptops, and the availability of a long term
supported release of Ubuntu that's independent of the commercial
success of Canonical meets the needs of specific manufacturers in the
hardware marketplace", continued Silber.

The Ubuntu Community Council will act as the advisory board of the
Foundation. Current members of that Council are Benjamin Mako Hill,
Colin Watson, James Troup and Mark Shuttleworth (Chairman).

Upstream (1, Redundant)

datadriven (699893) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013122)

If they send their security fixes upstream it may help debian.

Re:Upstream (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013188)

They do [ubuntulinux.org] .

I wonder if ... (4, Funny)

Laz10 (708792) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013134)

$10m will make sound work out of the box :p

Re:I wonder if ... (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013296)

Nah sorry, apparently they're "$1M short" so we'll have to wait. Rats, I have $0.50, how much do you have?

How does Debian fit in? (3, Interesting)

hubie (108345) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013135)

I am ignorant on this topic, and a quick look at the Ubuntu FAQ didn't help, but what exactly is the relationship between Debian and Ubuntu? Is Ubuntu a complete fork, or is it dependent on Debian for core functionality?

I am a bit confused because I see some people here give high praise for Ubuntu over Debian, things like how Debian is way too slow to release while Ubuntu is up to date, while others have pointed out that Ubuntu has the advantage where they can cherry pick the best things out of the x86 code that have gone through the rigorous testing in Debian.

From a support standpoint, when a security flaw is found, does Ubuntu fix it themselves (and thus make it available for Debian), or do they have to wait for the Debian packages to be fixed?

Re:How does Debian fit in? (4, Interesting)

rpsoucy (93944) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013176)

They started out friendly, but now Ubuntu is distancing itself more and more from Debian, they're making no effort to even stay compatible for package installation, which I think is hurting Debian in the long run. I really wish people would just try and help Debian if they have a problem with it instead of starting up yet another dist to make GNU/Linux "OS of a thousand distributions."

Re:How does Debian fit in? (5, Interesting)

SassyDave (557868) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013305)


I was going to mod you up so we could see a healthy discussion on this topic, but I'll reply instead.
They started out friendly, but now Ubuntu is distancing itself more and more from Debian
I have to respectfully disagree. I run Ubuntu on my laptop, and I have switched the /etc/apt/sources.list to use the Debian unstable sources. The two distros are binary compatible (meaning I can use Debian .deb files on Ubuntu), and it works great. I get the eye-candy of Ubuntu (a pretty good default setup) with the new packages of Debian unstable. I for one like the setup.

Re:How does Debian fit in? (5, Insightful)

wasabii (693236) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013308)

That's impossible simply because of the organization of Debian. It is not designed to be a supported commercial quality distro. Each maintainer has pure authority over their own packages.

Ubuntu strives to put together a cohesive distro without the infighting that happens so frequently. You must remember, time is money for these people. All the improvements on software that Ubuntu makes are available for Debian to pick up. Usually even submitted into Debian's bug system.

Re:How does Debian fit in? (0, Flamebait)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013454)

I really wish people would just try and help Debian if they have a problem with it instead of starting up yet another dist to make GNU/Linux "OS of a thousand distributions"

People did try to help Debian. The problem is that the Debian bureacracy is so thick that it is easier to deal with the federal government. The structure of the Debian organization discourages help, ideas, innovation and quality. The only way to help Debian would have been to destroy the entire organizational structure and start from scratch. Ubuntu is helping Debian - helping to put it out of it's misery.

Re:How does Debian fit in? (1)

TractorBarry (788340) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013461)

But I thought that was the whole point ?

"I am the black O/S in the woods with 10,000 young... IA ft'agn..."

and all that.

Re:How does Debian fit in? (1)

alucinor (849600) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013505)

It's strange that as Ubuntu seems to be moving away from Debian, other distros are moving toward [eweek.com] them.

Start of Something Special (5, Interesting)

Amadaeus (526475) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013147)

3 Years of desktop support and 5 years of server? The fact that Ubuntu is looking at long-term development for their OS instead of the usual 6-month fire-and-forget releases of many other Linux Distros subscribe to is an encouraging sign that Linux is coming of age.

Longer lifespans for Linux provides a level of security that will allow many users wary of switching over from Windows to start looking at a Linux distro as a serious replacement for their current OS. Just think: there IS an alternative to warning users that they have to buy a new OS for new features and security updates.

I'm only worried that theyll spend all $10m on pretzels and beer.

Re:Start of Something Special (1)

RAMMS+EIN (578166) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013281)

``I'm only worried that theyll spend all $10m on pretzels and beer.''

Pizza! You forgot pizza!

Or am I splintering the Ubuntu Foundation in a bazillion different flavors now?

Re:Start of Something Special (3, Funny)

SaDan (81097) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013354)

3 Years of desktop support and 5 years of server?


Let's see... Ubuntu is based on Debian, which takes about three years to put together a new release. Coincidence? ;-)

Ubuntu is catching up (1)

Nailer (69468) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013489)

Red Hat Enterprise already has a 7 year life cycle, and SLES has 5 years.

Asides from installing software, which is easier in Ubuntu, RHEL 4 or Fedora 4 should be easier than the current Ubuntu, as there's more system-config-* tools than Ubuntu GUI config apps.

more distributions than users (1)

rockytriton (896444) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013168)

Great! Now linux has more distributions than users!

Really impressed with Ubuntu (4, Informative)

jd142 (129673) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013179)

I just got a really cheap laptop and Mandriva(running on my desktop) didn't like it. Ubuntu just worked. And installing ndiswrapper for the wireless card was a piece of cake.

I've used Ubuntu as a rescue cd at work very reliably.

Can't wait until October for the next release.

What more could a company want? (4, Insightful)

kebes (861706) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013185)

This type of (financial) commitment to linux will do great things to silence (corporate) critics of FLOSS who say that there is no "structure and support" for linux. That's alot of money, and a solid commitment behind Ubuntu now. I'm glad that there are linux distros out there that are putting such an emphasis on having a product that is long-term, stable, and that will be patched/supported for a long time.

From my experience with Ubuntu (installed it with a friend on a brand-new powerbook), it is easy to use and works well. I really hope that the momentum Ubuntu is generating will continue... it is quickly becoming the best option for converting new users over to linux.

Time for a name change? (1)

i_like_spam (874080) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013197)

I've heard nothing but good things about 'Ubuntu'... But for some reason I can't bring myself to try it out because of the funny name.

Is anyone else out there in the same boat?

I guess I'll just stick with my Yoper distro.

funny names ? look at your username, dude (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013225)

[slashdot.org]

Re:Time for a name change? (1)

jd142 (129673) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013248)

At least it isn't Mandriva. ;)

longer support period (1, Interesting)

_|()|\| (159991) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013233)

Ubuntu looks promising, but it almost releases too often. A longer support period is welcome.

One thing I'd like to see is a looser coupling of the apps. and the O/S. I'm happy with a five year-old version of Windows, because I can trivially install new applications. Linux distributions encourage one-stop shopping, which is nice at first, but I shouldn't have to upgrade the entire O/S to get a newer version of Emacs. You can upgrade components piece meal; however, you lose some of the benefits of a tested distribution.

gamble or smart move? (1)

museumpeace (735109) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013234)

Shuttleworth coughed up the $10m himself if I haven't misread TFA. Not just a beau geste, I hope. This directly addresses the concern a lot of us lukewarm Linux wannabe users have: product life. Where and when do Shuttleworth and co. get back their $10m marketing investment? [RH's support is not free, is that where Ubuntu is going to get paid back?] They must think so to lay out that much cash.

Re:gamble or smart move? (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013441)

Shuttleworth has a little over $300 million in the bank. Invest a little bit of that half-way safely/intelligently and it's an infinite supply of cash. He has said publically that he isn't too concerned about Ubuntu becoming self-sustaining, though that is his goal.

Debian (2, Insightful)

countach (534280) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013244)

Why don't they just put the money into Debian? I guess I don't understand their motivation. Are they trying to become the next RedHat? Fair enough if they are I suppose, but the Debian/Ubuntu divide is a confusing one. I ended up installing Ubuntu just because the CD was free, and I didn't have to buy 20-something CDs.

Nice distro - shame about the name (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013249)

It's only a shame it has such a nutbag of a name.

For someone here in Australia, where you have a choice of Microsoft Windows 2003 Server (various editions), FreeBSD, Linux (as a generic proposition, assuming you don't go into the name), or if you're going to go into the name, this thing called Ubuntu.

Now, I dunno if Mark Shuttleworth and his paid mavens receive as much nigerian spam as I do, but anything that begins with U as a name and ends in "buntu" isn't making it past the spamassassin, let alone onto the server.

Keep the attitude, drop the name, and get on with things.

about them bugs (2, Interesting)

dmouritsendk (321667) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013274)

First, let me say I really like ubuntu(it's edged out gentoo as my perfered linux distro) and have nothing but respect for its developers.

But with that out of the way, I really think there's room for improvement in the bug-squashing/support department.

For example, I reported a bug about three months ago that made it impossible to enable DMA support on devices connected to my ATA controller(i knew it wasn't a hardware problem, or bios misconfiguration since i had a gentoo install on another partition where everything worked fine).

Several users promptly confirmed the issue, and a nice person linked to a thread on the forums where the issue was debated. The issue wasn't too complicated, and was bacially a hotplug bug that was fixed by blacklisting the ata controllers driver module and then adding it to /etc/modules.

The "problem" is, that it seems this bug is relevant for most i875 based motherboards(when the distro is installed on a sata disk, its then impossible to enable dma on the ATA devs), and its still not fixed in the repositories. To this day you still need to fix it manually, eventhough the bug is confirmed and very easily fixed.

Thats not very impressive if you ask me.

Re:about them bugs (1)

calc (1463) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013458)

I think this bug actually affects all controllers other than the one the root drive is on (not just i875/ich6). The issue is the primary controller module is loaded in the initrd and then the generic ide driver is loaded, after that the other ide controllers are loaded. I have seen this happen months ago on my box which uses via sata for root and via pata for optical drives. Though I am pretty sure this bug has already been fixed. Do you know the bug number?

Wrong link to Canonical, Ltd. (2)

HenrikOxUK (776979) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013276)

It should be: http://www.canonical.com/ [canonical.com]

Ubuntu review (5, Interesting)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013283)

I've been playing with Ubuntu lately, and I like it. There are some problems though:

Sound. I have to kill -9 the ESD process to get some applications to work. A lot of applications had to be tweaked individually after install.

Synaptic. Synaptic does its job, I can say that. But the user interface leaves a lot to be desired. I upgraded to Hoary yesterday. Why did that have to involve editing sources.list by hand?

Applications. Why the hell do newly installed applications need to be added to the menus manually? This is Ubuntu's biggest flaw. When you install a new program, you'd better know how to invoke it from the command line -- and good luck finding that out from Synaptic's description, which disappears after install anyway.

Firefox. Ubuntu's web browser of choice, Firefox, is unresponsive after opening new tabs. Firefox is much nicer in Windows. And IE for Windows is far more responsive than either.

Menus. I like the start menu organization. The "Places" menu is great. I was beginning to think that Linux was congenitally incapable of setting up the most important bit of UI on the system. The menu is even better in Hoary.

Folder Navigation. I don't like the fact that there is no back or up arrow when exploring file folders. This is massively stupid UI design.

All in all, it's a nice system. It's a million years behind Windows in usability; there is clunkiness present everywhere. But there are lots of free applications. As usual with Linux, it is so impossible to install or change anything without expert knowledge that you can safely recommend the system to your grandmother without the slightest fear that she will be able to mess anything up.

Re:Ubuntu review (1, Informative)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013361)

Is this your first time using gnome? Most of the time you have to restart x or gnome panel to get the menus to update, if not use SMEG to update them.

As for folder navigation, you must have spatial browsing enabled, you need to turn this off to get all the buttons and much more sane navigation.

Look round the Ubuntu forums and the starter guide.

Re:Ubuntu review (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013425)

Yeah but the point is you don't have to read the forums or the starter guide to get this functionality in Windows, it's just there out of the box. Stop trolling...

Re:Ubuntu review (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013472)

How was that a troll? If you can't work out how to do something look it up, customising the start menu programs folder in XP is hardly obvious to beginners either.

Re:Ubuntu review (1)

Henry V .009 (518000) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013478)

There are some programs that add themselves to menus. For me, this has been the exception. The majority do not.

I have assumed that there is some way to get better navigation. But, as Joe user, why should I have to read up on how to do it? Besides, I've had more important things to waste my time fixing -- the broken sound mainly.

Re:Ubuntu review (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013402)

Sure, Windows is slick and polished /sarcasm

Re:Ubuntu review (1)

tpwch (748980) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013508)

Sound. I have to kill -9 the ESD process to get some applications to work. A lot of applications had to be tweaked individually after install. Synaptic. Synaptic does its job, I can say that. But the user interface leaves a lot to be desired. I upgraded to Hoary yesterday. Why did that have to involve editing sources.list by hand? Applications. Why the hell do newly installed applications need to be added to the menus manually? This is Ubuntu's biggest flaw. When you install a new program, you'd better know how to invoke it from the command line -- and good luck finding that out from Synaptic's description, which disappears after install anyway. Firefox. Ubuntu's web browser of choice, Firefox, is unresponsive after opening new tabs. Firefox is much nicer in Windows. And IE for Windows is far more responsive than either. Menus. I like the start menu organization. The "Places" menu is great. I was beginning to think that Linux was congenitally incapable of setting up the most important bit of UI on the system. The menu is even better in Hoary. Folder Navigation. I don't like the fact that there is no back or up arrow when exploring file folders. This is massively stupid UI design. yes, the sound thing is a bit of a problem, but you don't have to kill -9 it, just disable gnomes sound server and then edit the esd configs (which I'm sure you can handlle if you can handle kill -9) to auto-spawn whenever its needed and then kill itself one second after it has stopped being used. editing sources.list by hand? just use the update manager. its in the menues. I've installed three different apps on my ubuntu setups today, they all ended up in the menu automatically. Firefox works fine here, and what does ie have to do with this? Firefox is the most popular browser, so its the default one. If you like opera or some other browser then just install it. Yep, the menu is great. And for the folder navigation thing, there is what you want, but its not enabled by default. You can enable it in the file manager preferences dialog (can't tell you more details since I'm not using an english locale, so I would get the names wrong)

10m$, huh? (2, Funny)

Anm (18575) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013301)

I would have though they could do better than one cent.

Oh... 10M$!!! Well then.

mod uP (-1, Troll)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013320)

great! (0)

Anonymous Coward | more than 9 years ago | (#13013356)

WhoopDeeDoo for Ubuntu

YES!! (1)

wind_ice_flames (894250) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013434)

I am very excited about the new foundation. I have used many distros and ubuntu was by far the easiest to install, configure, and maintain. Redhat, Fedora, Suse all have similar features, but were not as easy to configure. The sudo feature took a little to get used to, but I can see the benefit of doing so. (Especially if they were targeting windows users who think using the administatror user is good.) All in all the ubuntu foundation is a very GOOD thing.

I am Ubuntu's target audience (1)

yotto (590067) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013460)

I am new to Linux, been around computers since the 80's, used to a functional system "out of the box" and don't have time to figure out how to get my network card to work. I installed Sarge on my laptop and couldn't get the NIC to work. I'm not saying it was impossible, just not worth it to me. In tried Ubuntu and, sure enough, it (to quote a phrase) just worked.

Since then I've put Ubuntu on my main desktop as well, because my experience has been so positive. Did Ubuntu stop two potential installations of Debian? No. Debian stopped that.

The Age of Ubuntu (2, Insightful)

Doc Ruby (173196) | more than 9 years ago | (#13013509)

I still don't understand why the Ubuntu project isn't just the upgrade to the Debian project.

Debian's biggest problem, by far, is how long it takes to relase a new version (years). That's a packaging problem, because the new version is just a package of the packages already tested/debugged by the time the distro package is ready. Which means the bottleneck is testing the packages. Debugging is what consumes time, but testing and repackaging is what holds up the process.

Ubuntu now has the most agressive developers and distro team. And now it has $10M to work with. That goes a long way towards project management, getting Ubuntu releases every 6 months (their promise), rather than Debian's 3 years. All on top of Debian's base work. Many of Ubuntu's founders came from Debian core team members; more will likely join the better-funded project with the sparkling new brand name. I expect Ubuntu's pitch to their funders went quite along these lines.

The funders probably see a chance to take over as Debian's successor. They can get Debian's developers and userbase - that's practically all there is to Debian. Of course they won't get all users, because the Debian brand has loyalty, unless Debian terminates. And some users will leave a crippled Debian for a distro other than Ubuntu.

So unless Ubuntu can generate more users than Debian has, their move will result in a Debian2 smaller than Debian1. Quicker releases and a new start give them a chance. But that will really just let them stay the course.

Ubuntu needs a project that really takes off in their platform, the way APT did with Debian. I suggest an autoapt (easier)
or closely hyperlinked documentation (harder, but consolidates value much better). The autoapt, installed during the OS install, would subscribe users to patches, which would send email with recommendations, a changelog and hyperlinks to the source and installer. Making upgrades a snap, and reducing the TCO of the distro. As well as making that sysadmin task so easy that any user can do it, even if they aren't even expert enough to install the OS. Which will expand manifold the market of users skilled enough to use it, while making it more valuable to them. And to package developers whose SW will be "marketed" better. And to everyone using the platform, as security patches are more up-to-date in the field.

If Ubuntu replaces Debian, I want it to be better than Debian.

It's been a long while since Deb and Ian were an item. I wonder how long Debian itself can hold it together.
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  • dt
  • dd
  • em
  • strong
  • tt
  • blockquote
  • div
  • quote
  • ecode

"ecode" can be used for code snippets, for example:

<ecode>    while(1) { do_something(); } </ecode>